Inside the routine of dementia care

person in hospital gown using walking frame beside hospital bed

Dementia is a progressively degenerative disease of the brain that inflicts the more senior persons in our community. Though there are several cases where persons of unexpected younger age are admitted for having what is described as ‘early onset’ of the disease.

Depending on the specific section of the brain that is affected the disease manifest itself in many complex ways that impair the person’s cognitive competencies, mood, physical mobility, perceptions, memory, speech, and recognition. Although in recent years much research work is done, still little is known about the nature of this disease.

“Once a man, twice a child”, that proverbial saying often comes to mind when providing activities of daily living (ADL) to a resident. Often this entails brushing the teeth, changing clothes, giving a bath, and combing the hair.

Among many dementia sufferers, there is the progressive loss of balance and ability to move independently.  So the use of specialized wheelchairs and walkers is essential.  Locomotion from bed to wheelchair and vice versa entails using specialized weight bearing or non-weight bearing lifts.

All the above activities take place within the schedule of timetables for breakfast, lunch, supper and snack times. The times may differ based on the institution. But generally, breakfast starts at 9-10:30. Lunch 12 – 1:30 and supper at 6 – 7:30  and before bed snack.

Resident care is specific to the particular needs of the individual. The care plan is the document that all caregivers reference as a guide to the peculiarity of the resident. It prescribes how, when, why of the care given. The healthcare provider must, therefore, be very familiar with the care plan for each resident. This, of course, gets easier with continued care of the resident.

Similar to all professional service provider client privacy and confidentiality is of utmost importance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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